England Are Failing The Young and Vulnerable

First off I realize that many of my titles are emotive and arguably overstated but mostly they reflect what is generally felt once people have read my post, or at least how I feel as I write them so apologies.

Going back in my blogs I wrote about attending a round table discussion on inpatient mental health and a few of the reforms we though necessary to improve the current system; in a few weeks time I will be attending another of these discussion groups but this time with the Office of the Childrens’ Commissioner, and hopefully a larger group of individuals. I think we can all agree that at the moment there is a lack of staffing, funding, availability and general service when it comes to mental health facilities with many having to travel to different cities to acquire adequate mental health provision; but this is not the only area in which the government are failing.

A recent freedom of information request by NYAS revealed that the Department of Education and NHS England are failing to record adequate statistical data on the number of children in care and care leavers who are admitted to hospital due to mental health issues. With a response rate from mental health units only reaching 28% from this request NYAS has found that in the past five years at least a thousand children and young people have been admitted to mental health in-patient units whilst in care, the data of which is not shared across central government.

To paraphrase Claire Hyde (NYAS Assistant CEO) there is no meaningful statistical data on children and young people who are looked after or who are care leavers, there is no substantial information of their experiences beyond that of anecdotal evidence, of which NYAS may be more privy due to interpersonal relationships as advocates for those receiving treatment. To follow on from that there is also an alarming rate of children and young people who have to go out of their authorities catchment area in order to receive treatment which has left some social workers with a more blasé attitude towards their work concerning those individuals, and NYAS advocates often having to inform and remind social workers about the rights and entitlements of children and young people.

With children and young people both in, and having left care there are many concerns, especially with the media coverage of scandals in recent months. It is commonly felt that these individuals are the ones who slip through ‘everyone’s safety nets’ leaving them with ‘lifelong problems which cost society more in the long run’. Although the statistical data may be scares the anecdotal evidence from various news sources in long and concerning. It is not only the statistical data which is lacking, the Mental Health Code of  Practice8 highlights the requirement for independent mental health advocates to have experience of working with children and young people who are looked after or care leavers as well as the legislation governing them across both mental health and their legal status as looked after children and young people. Just look at my previous posts and you will see a whole host of issues with regards to advocacy and funding both within England and Wales, local government are still not competent enough to realize the importance of advocacy and the affect it can have on both helping the child or young person and the services they may be involved with.

Advocacy is not just about supporting children and young people with complaints

With those in or leaving care there is also still the issue of who is to fund their costs of living beyond those of the average NHS patient, such as clothing and toiletries just to give you some idea, and where do they turn when there is an issue with their funding especially if their foster carer/social worker/original LA is different to the one they are receiving treatment? From NYAS’s freedom of information request it was revealed that over 15% experienced delays to their hospital discharges due to a lack of foster or residential placement. The duration of stays ranged from one day to 540 days. Two young people were of no fixed abodes on admission. No data is gathered on how far children have to travel to the units from their homes. 50% did not record length of stay. Over 50 % had no advocacy provision in place.

This is just a small selection of the issues on offer, no doubt I will bring more to light in subsequent postings.

*Published in January 2015, the new code will come into force on 1 April 2015, subject to Parliamentary approval.

Thanks to Claire Hyde (NYAS Assistant CEO) and NYAS themselves for their Mental Health Article and prior round table discussion group on which this post is based.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s